Internship Opportunities with Assembly District 46

Dear Friend,

The 46th Assembly District Office Internship Program offers high school and college students a unique opportunity to participate in and experience the work of a state Assembly office. The program exposes students to district office operations and the grass roots activities of a legislator’s work. These experiences include working with constituents, conducting community outreach efforts, assisting community-based organizations, organizing civic events and projects, database development and upkeep, staffing the office, and other activities.

Internships are available to all part-time or full-time students 16 years of age or older. Depending on their high school or college programs, students may also receive different types of school credits for participating as an intern.

Many legislators and senior policy staff began their careers by interning in a district office. It is an invaluable way to gain a true understanding of California’s democratic process, as well as an excellent opportunity to make important contacts while serving the community.

Interns will gain valuable education and work experience by fully participating in agreed-upon hours of work. All internship work is voluntary and students will not receive any monetary compensation.

If you are interested in participating in the 46th Assembly District Office Internship Program, simply email my Field Representative, Steven Butcher at . In the subject line of the email please write “Internship.” You should indicate in the email that you are interested in interning and attach a copy of your resume.

As space becomes available, qualified candidates will be invited for an interview. Thank you for your interest in this very unique opportunity to serve your community. I look forward to your participation. If you have any questions you can contact Steven Butcher at (818) 376-4246.

Sincerely,

Adrin Nazarian

Assemblymember, 46th Assembly District

Mission Area Town Hall w/ L.A. City Attorney Mike Feuer

Meet Attorney Mike Feuer and Neighborhood Prosecutor Ayelet Feiman — your local problem solver.

Thursday, June 11, 2015
6:30pm

LAPD Mission Station
11121 N Sepulveda Blvd
Mission Hills, CA 91345

Half the People in LA to Ditch their Cars? It’ll Happen, Insists Mayor

Mayor Eric Garcetti released a long-range plan multibillion dollar plan, including bikesharing and solar panels, to get Los Angeles green.

Mayor Eric Garcetti released a long-range plan today that lays out his goals for making the city more economically and environmentally sustainable, including adding electric car charging outlets and bikeshare stations around the city and installing more solar panels on local rooftops and lots.

Garcetti, who discussed the 20-year sustainability plan at Echo Park Lake this morning, wants the city to set goals — most of them to be achieved over the next 10 and 20 years — in dozens of areas, such as cutting water and electricity usage, making buildings more energy efficient and reducing dependence on cars for transportation.

He is calling for reducing per capita water use 22.5 percent by 2025 and 25 percent by 2035, and aiming to cut greenhouse gas emissions 45 percent by 2025, 60 percent by 2035 and 80 percent by 2050.

Garcetti wants to raise the amount of local solar power produced to 900 to 1,500 megawatts by 2025, and 1,500 to 1,800 megawatts by 2035. Among the ideas in the plan for increasing local solar energy is to put at least 1 megawatt of solar energy capacity atop the Los Angeles Convention Center by 2017. Read more

Los Angeles Will Finally Fix its Sidewalks!

For the first time in the history of Los Angeles, the City has made a commitment this week to establishing a sustainable, fair, long-term sidewalk repair policy by settling the Willits class action lawsuit. The City will invest $31 million per year for the next 30 years to fix our broken sidewalks!

“As chairman of the Public Works committee, I have been committed to finding solutions to fixing our streets and sidewalks since my first day on the Los Angeles City Council. The settlement of this lawsuit is a win for not only the mobility impaired, but for all Angelenos as it finally requires the city to fix its broken sidewalks. There are no losers here. I look forward to hearing from the public as we develop the details in the Public Works Committee on how residents can submit repair requests, which locations to prioritize and how quickly we can start the work,” said Councilman Joe Buscaino.

The basic terms of the settlement are as follows:

  • 30 year agreement
  • $31 million per year (in today’s dollars)
  • 15% cost escalator every 5 years to keep up with inflation
  • Will increase to $67 million per year in the final 5 years
  • Total: just over $1.3 billion
  • $5 million per year will be dedicated to curb ramps, and $26 million will be dedicated to sidewalks
  • 20% will go toward addressing specific requests made by disabled persons

Locations will be prioritized as follows:

  1. City offices and facilities (parks, rec centers, libraries, police stations, etc)
  2. Transportation corridors
  3. Hospitals, medical facilities, assisted living facilities and similar
  4. Places of public accommodation such as commercial and business zones
  5. Facilities containing employers
  6. Residential Neighborhoods

FAQ

  1. How can residents report broken sidewalks?

Call 311 or use the MyLA311 app

  1. How soon will my sidewalk be fixed?

The settlement requires repairs next to city-owned facilities first. It will take at least 2 years before that work is complete and we can move on to repairs of sidewalks adjacent to private property

  1. How can I see where my request is on the list?

There is no list of individual locations, only general direction on what types of locations get priority over what. The Budget & Finance and Public Works Committees will hold hearings in the coming months to solicit public input and develop a fair and transparent policy about priority of specific requests, as well as all of the other policy details like:

  • whether the city will pay for sidewalk repair after the 30 years or return the responsibility to the adjacent property owner
  • whether city workers or contract workers will do the work
  • whether alternative materials like porous pavement and rubber sidewalks will be allowed
  • whether the city will pay for 100 % of the repair costs, or implement a cost sharing program like 50/50.

After 40 years with no repair policy, we’re not going to get one in place overnight. But this week’s action commits the City to solving this problem.

City Uses App to Alert People Trained in CPR of Nearby Emergencies They Can Help With

LA partners with PulsePoint to empower residents to help save lives.

Mayor Eric Garcetti and the fire chief unveiled a smartphone app Wednesday that alerts people with CPR training if someone in a nearby public area is suffering from cardiac arrest and needs their help.

The PulsePoint app sends alerts to its users at the same time fire department dispatchers are notifying emergency crews; guides users through the CPR steps; and also shows the location of nearby defibrillators.

The alerts are only sent out for cardiac arrest victims who happen to be in a public area. Health privacy and safety concerns prevent alerts to be sent out on people suffering heart attacks at private residences.

The app also displays data about ongoing and recent emergency calls handled by the Los Angeles Fire Department, which gets about 1,200 calls daily, about 85 percent of them for medical emergencies.

The mayor announced the app with Fire Chief Ralph Terrazas at Woodrow Wilson High School in El Sereno, where 120 students have been trained in CPR.

“This app connects trained lifesavers who may already be on scene with people who need immediate help, when seconds count the most,” Garcetti said.

Terrazas said the department worked out a contract with the appmaker, PulsePoint, that “allows the LAFD to help save lives with our smartphones, which is technology that most of us already have in hand.”

“I am excited that Angelenos have another crucial tool at their fingertips that can help them further engage with their communities and fire department,” he said.

Anyone trained in CPR, whether they are off-duty public safety responders or an average citizen, can download and use the app, which is available for iPhones and Android devices.

The app is also in use in areas covered by the Los Angeles County Fire Department, which integrated the app last summer.

The creator of PulsePoint, Richard Price, is a former Bay Area fire chief who was on break eating at a restaurant when a person in the next building had a heart attack. Price was not monitoring the dispatch system and did not learn about it until the fire trucks pulled up.

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